Category Archives: From nerds to nerds

Atlassian dropping IE 6 support

I found this one here in the atlassian forums, unfortunately the link posted there is broken.

Hi guys,

We are announcing our end of life of Atlassian support for Internet Explorer 6 on JIRA.

This will be effective from the launch date of JIRA 4.2 (target Q3, 2010). This means that JIRA 4.1 will be the last version of JIRA to support IE6. (From JIRA 4.0 to JIRA 4.1, all of the main functionality will work in IE 6; however, some of the visual effects will be missing).

The End of Support Announcements for JIRA specifies end of support for browsers, appserver and JDK. We should add Atlassian products to the IE death march.

IE 6 death march

This year is a great year for web development. We will witness the “end of life” of IE 6. And as far as I got it right from here, IE 7 is being trashed on the same day:

13-Jul-2010
Internet Explorer 7 on Windows XP Professional Service
Internet Explorer 6 on Windows XP Professional

And sincerely: this is good. I just hope companies start upgrading soon, why should we wait until July? I just hope that Google, Amazon, Ebay and others take the chance to honor this date. What about turning off IE 6 support completely for a week or two? This surely would help companies to speed up transition…

But IE 6 was not all pain…  did you see this one here? So sad and funny at the same time… There is even a website dedicated to the IE death march!

So before you update to IE 8 I just wanted to point out that…

  • Internet Explorer is a piece of software more generally called “web browser
  • It might come as a surprise, but the Internet Explorer is not the only browser available for Windows users…
  • Sadly, Internet Explorer browser updates are the only ones the inexplicably involve updating half of the underlying OS ;-)
  • Internet Explorer has been the least compliant browser for several years
  • Internet Explorer has been the slowest browser for several users/ years

So, before updating, have a look at Safari, Chrome, Firefox, Opera. They are all far better (faster, more secure, more compliant) in browsing the web than Internet Explorer.

And you don’t have to fear your OS is vulnerable or broken after installing a update.

And, just in case you missed that one: HTML5 is the next big step in the web development. Google and Apple are the key players this time. Not Microsoft. Microsoft announced that they will setup a set of tests to evaluate HTML5. And they announced that IE 9 will be able to draw round corners (this is innovation from Microsofts point of view, really).

With HTML5 we will leverage the web to next level, the new features are awesome. Safari, Chrome, Firefox and Opera already support the vast majority of the HTML5 features:

Google Bets Big on HTML 5: News from Google I/O

What if Operating Systems Were Airlines?

There are things that must not get lost in time.
Best thing to do is backup. So here is my backup:

  • DOS Airlines
    Everybody pushes the airplane until it glides, then they jump on and let the plane coast until it hits the ground again, then they push again jump on again, and so on.
  • OS/2 Airlines
    The terminal is almost empty, with only a few prospective passengers milling about. The announcer says that their flight has just departed, wishes them a good flight, though there are no planes on the runway. Airline personnel walk around, apologising profusely to customers in hushed voices, pointing from time to time to the sleek, powerful jets outside the terminal on the field. They tell each passenger how good the real flight will be on these new jets and how much safer it will be than Windows Airlines, but that they will have to wait a little longer for the technicians to finish the flight systems.
    Once they finally finished you’re offered a flight at reduced cost.  To board the plane, you have your ticket stamped ten different times by standing in ten different lines. Then you fill our a form showing where you want to sit and whether the plane should look and feel like an ocean liner, a passenger train or a bus. If you succeed in getting on the plane and the plane succeeds in taking off the ground, you have a wonderful trip…except for the time when the rudder and flaps get frozen in position, in which case you will just have time to say your prayers and get in crash position.
  • Windows Air
    The terminal is pretty and colorful, with friendly stewards, easy baggage check and boarding, and a smooth take-off.  After about 10 minutes in the air, the plane explodes with no warning whatsoever.
  • Windows NT Air
    Just like Windows Air, but costs more, uses much bigger planes, and takes out all the other aircraft within a 40-mile radius when it explodes.
    Continue reading What if Operating Systems Were Airlines?

If programming languages ran the Airlines

There are things that must not get lost in time.
Best thing to do is backup. So here is my backup:

  • PL/1 Mainframe Air:
    You arrive at the airport. It’s not really an airport, but actually an old wooden building next to the river. You ask why there isn’t a real airport. A very old man answers you that they have been building with wood ever since the beginning of construction, so it must be good. You ask where you can check in and when your plane leaves, but you are answered that they really don’t have any planes, because they think planes are too modern. Instead, you must place your luggage and yourself into a rowing boat in the river. This is because people have been using rowing boats for centuries, so rowing boats have proven that they work very good. You argue that a rowing boat can’t possibly take you to your destination 2000 miles away, but the old man insists that you try. After all, the rowing boat has never let HIM down. The fact that he only ever went as far as 2 miles up the river can’t convince him. In the end, with no choice left, you decide to give it a try. At first, all goes quite well. The old man can steer the rowing boat very fast down the river, but when you finally arrive at sea, the old man has a heart-attack and dies. You are now in the middle of the ocean, with nothing but a pair of paddles. Good luck.
    Continue reading If programming languages ran the Airlines